Shook shakes up the live sports experience

By Ken Kerschbaumer

What s the biggest difference between college and professional football? Leaving aside the contracts, different approaches to instant replay and the speed and size of the players it s also the fan experience. Nearly every college football stadium is bound to have a high-percentage of fans in the parking lot during the game, unable to get tickets but still wanting to revel in the atmosphere.

So when Texas A&M reached out to Shook Mobile Technology to discuss a way to help fans in the parking lot watch the game more easily Ron Crockett, Shook director of sales and marketing and his team came up with an innovative solution: a PLC-controlled video display that has a 30×20 feet Mitsubishi display that can be folded into a regular truck trailer.

Before something like this would have been labor intensive but with the use of programmable logic and onboard computers the vast majority of the operations are automated, says Crockett.

The biggest hurdle the trailer overcomes is simplifying the mechanics of getting a massive screen into an operable and safe position quickly.

The real challenge is you can t have a screen of that size traveling down the road in one piece and have the trailer be low enough to be within DOT road rules, says Crockett. So we had to put the pieces together and fit within one millimeter of each other to look like a single piece.

Once on site and hooked up to a power generator it s magic time for the trailer as it raises one of two 10-feet tall sections, spins it around, and mounts it on top of the other. Side stabilizers ensure the screen can withstand high winds. There are a lot of interconnects for the LED high-resolution screen but a lot of the interfaces are automated, says Shook.

How easy it to use? One person can both set it up and take it down.
Texas A&M will use the screen for all sorts of sports, from football to baseball, track and field and soccer. Event concerts in the park will take advantage of the big screen.

This lets thousands of people at a sold-out game have a front-row seat to what is going on, says Shook. It extends the crowd size and prevents from feeling left out.