EVS a Main Player in 24th Universiade in Bangkok

EVS
provided the first completely tapeless system ever used for a sports broadcast
in

Thailand
to cover the 24th Universiade. (August 8 to 18)

Eight
4-Channel XT[2] servers recording in IMX 30, with 21 total IP Directors used
for various purposes including logging, clip creation, and on-air playout.

MCOT Public Company LTD, the foremost national broadcasting company in

Thailand and
the company in charge of the production for the 24th edition of these Summer
World University Games, needed a system that would cover eight concurrent feeds
and provide browsing for six edit suites, as well as playout facilities for
both the international and local unilateral feeds.

“The system we have used in the past is already pretty large,” said
Amnaj Somrijaram of MCOT. “We wanted something that wouldn’t add much size
while adding greater efficiency and EVS provided it for us.”

EVS and TX International of Thailand, in charge of installations, proposed a
fully tapeless solution that included eight 4-Channel XT[2] servers recording
in IMX 30, with 21 total IP Directors used for various purposes including
logging, clip creation, and on-air playout. Additionally, two XFile[2] gateways
were used for archiving and to transmit content to and from craft editor
positions.

Logging information was inserted on the fly by loggers using the IP Director

The crew at the event included staff from various Thai TV stations for the
local feed, and Europeans for the international feed, all with varying levels
of experience with EVS equipment, and different expectations of what the system
would do. Thanks to the user-friendly interface of the IP Director and the reliability
of the XT[2], these differences did not raise any problem for the production.

Logging information was inserted on the fly by loggers using the IP Director.
This information was instantly available for editors and playout operators
across the network. Editors then used the browser of the IP Director to
retrieve content based on the logging information, and could transfer it to
their edit platform much faster than real time. Edits could also be sent back to
the EVS network for playout.

Playout positions used a dual control of IP Directors and XT[2]. Playout
consisted of turnaround feeds (delays, cut downs) as well as playlists, which
were retrieved using the logging information and were organized clearly in bins
and groups on the IP Director.

“The IP Director performed wonderfully for this event,” said Olivier Heurteaux,
Sales & Operations Manager for EVS Hong Kong. “Thanks to the very
detailed user rights of the IP Director systems, both productions [international and unilateral] were using the same raw material and the same logging information, but their edits, playlists, and bins
were not visible to the other group.”

From the
XT[2] to the XFile, all equipment natively supports the IMX 30 format, which
meant that none of the content needed to be reformatted during any processes.
The content stayed in IMX all the way through to playout, which avoided
generation loss and ultimately improved the quality of the production.

“The production team in charge of the international coverage of the Games
was extremely pleased by the versatility of the system provided by EVS in

Bangkok. This system brought
extreme flexibility in our production” said Cedric Roger, in charge of the
production for FISU.

“We were particularly impressed by the reliability and stability of the
EVS tapeless system. In the end, the EVS system offered more choices for
content production, faster access, and more time for editing and
polishing,” said Somrijaram. “The final product just looked better
than in previous years.”