All Mobile Video 3D Truck Slated To Hit the Streets by NAB

The latest remote-production-truck provider to take the 3D plunge, All Mobile Video will roll out a 53-ft. double-expando 3D-capable production truck at NAB, according to President Eric Duke.

“The truck will have a strong 2D backbone but is also 3D-capable,” says Duke. “Our goal is to make the truck user-friendly so, if a client books an HD show and decides they want to do a 3D production, they can go to the B unit and go 3D.”

The trailer will be similar in design to the company’s current Titan unit, with a 3G routing infrastructure, Studer Vista 8 audio console, Sony MVS-8000G production switcher, SRW recording decks, and HD monitors.

The 3D difference is courtesy of 3ality Digital 3D rigs using Sony HDC-1500 cameras. “We are going to be cautious in terms of owning rigs,” says Duke. “We will probably own three or four and then rent others as needed. The three or four rigs will give clients a chance to play with 3D techniques.”

All Mobile Video’s unit will officially be the second 3D-capable unit to hit the road, following the debut of NEP’s unit last fall. And like NEP, Duke says, All Mobile Video will use the unit to experiment with different approaches to 3D productions and equipment needs.

“The industry hasn’t figured out how 3D will impact the test-and-measurement scopes, processing gear, and upconverter and downconverter needs,” says Duke. “And how will the 3D show be cut if the truck also does the 2D feed? Is there a separate back bench for 3D like when an entertainment show produces a feed for large video screens at the venue?”

There is also an opportunity to find out about how staffing needs will change. “There will need to be someone on the truck dealing with convergence issues,” says Duke, “and that is not going to be a role for the engineer in charge (EIC).”

So why now, when there seems to be extremely limited demand for 3D? “It’s the thrill of getting together with a good group of engineers, working out a complex problem, and making a business out of it,” says Duke.

The danger facing the industry, he says, is producing bad 3D, something that will not benefit anyone. “We feel this is a calculated gamble, and we aren’t expecting a big payback,” he says. “There is a lot of opportunity, and we’ll be sowing some seeds and see where things go.”