Utah Scientific Delivers MADI, Eyes 3D

Utah Scientific is the latest company to embrace the MADI interface. Its new family of I/O boards for the Utah-400 router allow users to choose MADI audio and IP video input and output options as well as the existing analog and digital video and audio options available, which include 3 Gbps support.

NCP is the first mobile-truck client to embrace the Utah Scientific MADI system. “MADI will eliminate the need for 300 cables between their trucks and tape rooms,” says Tom Harmon, president/CEO of Utah Scientific.

The routing switchers include the full range of analog, digital, and HDTV systems and high-density frame sizes (including 144 frame in 9RU, 288 frame in 16RU, and 528 frame in 20 RU).

Utah Scientific is also delivering more bang for the buck, with big frames like the 1056×1056 now at the same price as previous, 512×512 routers.

And Utah Scientific will also continue to address the need for moving data and IP traffic. MPEG h.264 encoder inputs and outputs are built into the router, and the company is working on full-bandwidth encapsulated IP routing.

“We’re also watching 10G technology, and we firmly believe that IP is the way of the future,” says Harmon. “Broadcast engineers aren’t all IT-savvy for setting up things like VLANs and port speed, so our routers will complement Cisco routers and allow engineers to go IP without learning 700 pages of Cisco manuals.”

While there is plenty of buzz around 3D needs (dual link through master control is Utah’s current approach, but single link 3D I/Os will be addressed in the future), Harmon says the industry is looking for reliability and fewer bells and whistles.

“Last year, everyone was cramming multiviewer capabilities into their routers, and that is just another failure mode and a high-turnover technology,” he says. “We don’t think you should put those features into a router.”